crafting a success — multimedia-style

Seamless. The best quality…well…anything…is seamlessly put together, seemingly without effort, concentration, or thought – as though the item in question simply popped out of the ground, fully formed. It is a seamless multimedia story that is the best – so smooth in its transitions and integration of words, music, and pictures that the viewers don’t stop to think about the transitions between the forms of media…. They become so absorbed in the story, they forget about the way this version of the story was created at all.
Words can bring impact. Sentences that slice at emotion and pull in readers with intrigue manage to pull their own weight – and a well-placed photo of war in a distant land, or a town local doing her bit to make her community better, can up the intrigue and interest twofold. Imagine, then, the INCREASED interest that occurs when the words are spoken…when the photos are moving…when the pictures appear in an order less ambiguous and stationary than on sheets of newspaper, or on a magazine spread. Think of photos and videos appearing like scenes in a play, making us wonder what happens next.
Good multimedia stories inadvertently keep our interest “biggering and biggering” (the Lorax, anyone?), and send information in a more engaging way than simply reading words off of a sheet of paper. (As easy as this task is for many people nowadays, it seems that reading news off of a paper is quickly disappearing…and as the times “are a’changing,” people who deliver news must learn to change with it.)
The two examples I found are about the DREAM Act, a national Act that would allow undocumented students (students without legal U.S. presence) who had spent most of their young lives in American schools and succeeded to continue onto colleges and universities at an in-state rate. I feel they successfully tell a story about a struggle that many students face. Without honing in on a particular story, both these videos educate about an ongoing sturggle – good examples of nonlinear storytelling, I think.
Go ahead – see if you agree.
Seamless. The best quality…well…anything…is seamlessly put together, seemingly without effort, concentration, or thought – as though the item in question simply popped out of the ground, fully formed. It is a seamless multimedia story that is the best – so smooth in its transitions and integration of words, music, and pictures that the viewers don’t stop to think about the transitions between the forms of media…. They become so absorbed in the story, they forget about the way this version of the story was created at all.
Words can bring impact. Sentences that slice at emotion and pull in readers with intrigue manage to pull their own weight – and a well-placed photo of war in a distant land, or a town local doing her bit to make her community better, can up the intrigue and interest twofold. Imagine, then, the INCREASED interest that occurs when the words are spoken…when the photos are moving…when the pictures appear in an order less ambiguous and stationary than on sheets of newspaper, or on a magazine spread. Think of photos and videos appearing like scenes in a play, making us wonder what happens next.
Good multimedia stories inadvertently keep our interest “biggering and biggering” (the Lorax, anyone?), and send information in a more engaging way than simply reading words off of a sheet of paper. (As easy as this task is for many people nowadays, it seems that reading news off of a paper is quickly disappearing…and as the times “are a’changing,” people who deliver news must learn to change with it.)
The two examples I found are about the DREAM Act, a national Act that would allow undocumented students (students without legal U.S. presence) who had spent most of their young lives in American schools and succeeded to continue onto colleges and universities at an in-state rate. I feel they successfully tell a story about a struggle that many students face. Without honing in on a particular story, both these videos educate about an ongoing sturggle – good examples of nonlinear storytelling, I think.
Go ahead – see if you agree.
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1 Comment

Filed under Alex Strack

One response to “crafting a success — multimedia-style

  1. The notion of seamless editing appears to be an obvious one, but you’re right. It’s imperative to have seamless editing otherwise the viewer cannot make sense of it.

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